Lime: Product Highlight

Plant Details

Lime (Citrus aurantifolia), is a species of citrus tree in the Rutaceae family.  It is native to the southeast region of Asia.  Lime trees are shrub-like and can grow to around fifteen feet in height.  The trees have many branches that can start growing far down on the trunks.  The leaves of lime trees can grow to be from one to four inches long and are oval in shape, similar to orange leaves.  Lime flowers are about one inch across and white with a purple tinge on the petals.  Lime trees can flower and fruit throughout the year with the most abundant harvests seen from May to September.  The fruit of the tree grows to be one to 4 inches in diameter and is harvested and most commonly sold while still green.  Lime fruits will turn yellow as they fully ripen. 

History

The English name “lime” has evolved from the Persian word “limu” to the Arabic “lima” before being translated through French and Spanish to reach the word recognized today.  Most lime varieties are believed to originate in areas of southern and southeastern Asia and were spread across the world through international trade and migration.  A mass migration originating in the area of modern-day Taiwan spread limes into Polynesia and Micronesia from around 300 to 1500 BCE and the fruits reached the Mediterranean region and the Middle East around 1200 BCE by way of spice and incense trade routes.  From there, limes were traded into Europe and made their way to the West Indies and North America on the ships of Spanish explorers.  Horticulturist Henry Perrine is credited with introducing the key lime to Florida where it came to be widely cultivated. 

During the nineteenth century, limes were used to treat and prevent scurvy among British naval soldiers because of the fruit's high vitamin C content.  The soldiers were issued a daily ration of the fruit and the consumption of citrus was a guarded military secret as scurvy was a common issue among the navies of many nations.  This practice eventually earned British navy soldiers the nickname “limey”.  An early description of the fruit from 1905 claims that limes are among the “finest fruits on the market” and are aromatic, juicy, and highly superior to lemons.  

Lime essential oil has been used It is also utilized for its fragrance in perfumery and acts as a popular note in men's cologne. 

Extraction

Lime trees can begin producing fruit as soon as one year after the seedlings are planted but they generally do not achieve a sizable harvest until four to eight years of age.  They will reach their highest harvest yield at around ten years old.  Lime trees will bear harvestable fruit approximately nine months after blossoming.  Limes are picked for processing when they reach full size and begin to turn yellow, indicating ripeness.  Lime Essential Oil is extracted from the peel of the fruits using the cold pressing method.  The resulting essential oil is thin and clear to light yellow in color and has a sweet, tropical, citrus aroma.  

Benefits & Uses

The many beneficial components and varied uses of Lime Essential Oil have earned it a reputation for being invigorating, cleansing, and soothing for the body, mind, and spirit. 

In aromatherapy, Lime Essential Oil may help to balance the emotions and uplift the mood.  It is known to alleviate feelings of stress and anxiety while encouraging positivity and boosting mental and physical energy.  Lime Oil has been found to support healthy cognition by helping to clear the mind and improve concentration and memory.  

When diluted and used topically, Lime Essential Oil may help to cleanse and smooth the skin for a radiant complexion.  It is believed to balance oil and sebum production and soothe inflammation to improve skin tone and combat blemishes.  Lime Oil may also help to reduce signs of aging such as fine lines, wrinkles, and dark spots.  In hair care, it may help to reduce oil production on the scalp and add shine to the hair.  Lime Essential Oil is believed to encourage quick healing in minor wounds while helping to prevent infection. 

Lime Essential Oil can be used to clean and protect the home by working to eliminate unwanted odors in the air and repelling pest insects like flys and mosquitos.  

Here are some recipes using Lime Essential Oil that we love...

 

Brain Boost Diffuser Blend

Brain Boost Diffuser Blend

 Ingredients

Instructions

Add water to your diffuser up to the fill line.  Add drops of the essential oil blend.  This diffuser blend recipe is formulated for a 200ml ultrasonic diffuser.  Adjust the amount according to the size and directions of your diffuser.  

 

Balance & Shine Roll On Scalp Oil

Balance & Shine Roll On Scalp Oil

Ingredients

Instructions

Add the essential oils to the bottle.  Fill the rest of the bottle to the top with fractionated coconut oil.  Replace the rollerball and cap, and gently shake to combine.  Part hair, roll on the scalp, and allow to sit for 15 to 30 minutes before shampooing.  

 

Sunny Day Room Spray

Sunny Day Room Spray

Ingredients

Instructions

Mix all ingredients inside a 4oz glass bottle with a spray or mister top.  Shake well to combine thoroughly and again before each use.  Spray all around the room before meditation to create a tranquil environment.  

 

Inner Glow Toning Cleanser

Inner Glow Toning Cleanser

Ingredients

Instructions

Measure liquid castile soap, vegetable glycerine, sweet almond oil, and essential oils into a bowl and stir thoroughly to combine.  Add water, a little at a time, while stirring gently to avoid creating too many bubbles.  Allow any bubbles to dissipate and pour the mixture into the bottle.  Some settling may occur so shake well before each use. 

 

Freshen Up Carpet Powder

Freshen Up Carpet Powder 

Ingredients

Instructions

Add essential oils to baking soda and work the mixture together with gloved hands.  Sprinkle across carpet, rugs, and upholstery to absorb odors.  Allow the mixture to sit for 15 minutes before vacuuming. 

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